In-toeing in Children with Type I Osteogenesis Imperfecta

An Observational Descriptive Study

Marta Elena Losa Iglesias, PhD *, Ricardo Becerro de Bengoa Vallejo, DPM, PhD  and Paloma Salvadores Fuentes, PhD *

* Department of Health Sciences II-Facultad de CC de la Salud, Universidad Rey Juan Carlos, Madrid, Spain.
{dagger} Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Madrid, Spain.

Corresponding author: Marta Elena Losa Iglesias, PhD, Department of Health Sciences II-Facultad de CC de la Salud, Universidad Rey Juan Carlos, Avenida de Atenas s/n, Alcorcon, Madrid 28922, Spain. (E-mail: marta.losa@urjc.es )

 

Abstract

Background: Osteogenesis imperfecta is an autosomal-dominant disorder of the connective tissue. Also known as brittle bone disease, it renders those affected susceptible to fractures after minimal trauma. Therefore, it is important to minimize the risk of falls and subsequent fractures in patients with this disease. In-toeing is a common condition in children that can result from various pathologic entities, including anteversion, internal tibial torsion, and metatarsus adductus. These conditions can result in frequent tripping and other functional problems.

Methods: A descriptive study was undertaken to determine the prevalence of in-toeing gait attributable to tibial or femoral torsion or metatarsus adductus in children with type I osteogenesis imperfecta. The study involved orthopedic and biomechanical examination of 15 children (9 girls and 6 boys) aged 4 to 9 years with confirmed type I osteogenesis imperfecta. Patients who used assistive ambulatory devices, such as canes, crutches, and wheelchairs, were excluded from the study.

Results: Of the 15 children studied, 12 (80%) demonstrated previously undiagnosed in-toeing gait attributable to torsional deformity or metatarsus adductus in all but one child.

Conclusions: Many children with confirmed type I osteogenesis imperfecta have in-toeing gait caused by torsional deformity or metatarsus adductus. Detection and control of in-toeing gait in children with osteogenesis imperfecta is important to prevent fractures resulting from trauma directly related to these conditions. (J Am Podiatr Med Assoc 99(4): 326–329, 2009)

 

free fulltext : In-toeing in Children with Type I Osteogenesis Imperfecta

 

Supported  by
CLINICAL PEDIATRIC ONLINE 

Yudhasmara Foundation 

JL Taman Bendungan Asahan 5 Jakarta Indonesia

phone : 62(021) 70081995 – 5703646 

email : judarwanto@gmail.com,

http://clinicalpediatric.wordpress.com/

 

 

Clinical and Editor in Chief :

DR WIDODO JUDARWANTO

email : judarwanto@gmail.com,

 

Copyright © 2009, Clinical Pediatric Food Allergy Information Education Network. All rights reserved.

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