Ophthalmic assessment of physically disabled children attending a rehabilitation centre

P. FLETT 1 1 Regency Park Centre for Young Disabled, Kilkenny, South Australia, Australia , B. SAUNDERS 1

 

 Correspondence: P. Flett, Adelaide Children’s Hospital, 72 King William Road, North Adelaide, SA 5006, Australia.

P. Flett, FRACP, FACRM. B. Saunders, FRACO.

Copyright 1993 Paediatrics and Child Health Division, Royal Australasian College of Physicians

KEYWORDS

cerebral palsy • disability • ophthalmic • rehabilitation • spina bifida • strabismus
ABSTRACT

Abstract A retrospective analysis was conducted of 397 children, ranging in age from 2 to 19 years, attending the Regency Park Centre for Young Disabled in Adelaide. The disorders represented included cerebral palsy, head injury, spina bifida, severe speech and/or language disorders, muscular dystrophy and a number of less common conditions. The incidence of significant ophthalmic abnormalities in this population was 51%, with the highest incidence being 69 and 62% among children with head injury and cerebral palsy, respectively. Children with severe speech and language disorders had an incidence of 24%. Overall, routine examinations revealed previously unsuspected significant eye abnormalities in 31% of the children. A complete ophthalmic examination should be part of the evaluation of all physically disabled children to ensure early identification and treatment of abnormalities, and to optimize rehabilitation.

 

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